Who will be at our next event?

Rescues:

 

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    Precios Paws Rescue   pixie log 4Betterdays

 

         Diamonds     Joyfulrescue     CBAS      BuffaloCares            Open Arms

Silver Lining                  Buddy second chance

Ten Lives Club   Buff Paws and Claws

 

 

 

 

Sponsors:

Lead Dog:

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Shaggy Dog: 

Subaru
Northtown Subaru

 

 

 

 

 

Tail Wagger:

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William Mattar

 

 

Services/Products:

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No automatic alt text available.     Erie.gov homepage

 

Vendors:

Girl Scout Junior Troop 30808:

As part of their Bronze Award, Troop 30808 will be collected non-perishable pet foods for donation to local food pantries.  The girls will also be selling fleece pet toys (proceeds to benefit local groups) and each adopted pet will receive a toy in their goody bag! The girls will be offering free face painting during the event as well.

Troop 30808

Boy Scout Troop 457:

Troop 457 will have food and drinks available for sale including hot dogs, chips, donuts, soda and bottled water.

 

redcross-logo

Volunteers from the Western New York Chapter American Red Cross will be onsite promoting the Sound the Alarm campaign. Tsound-the-alarm-logo-299x205his spring, Red Cross volunteers and our partners will install 100,000 free smoke alarms in high risk neighborhoods nationwide. Sound the Alarm installation and fire safety events will take place in more than 100 communities across the country, providing a lifesaving service in our quest to reduce death and injury from home fires.

Keep watch as more rescues & vendors are announced!

 

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Celebrate July 4th Safely!

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Follow these tips to keep your pet safe this Independence Day:

1. Keep your Pet Indoors at All Times!

More Pets are lost on Independence Day than any other day of the year. It may seem obvious, but even if your pet is used to being outside, the resulting panic caused by fireworks or other loud noises may make them break their restraint or jump a fence in a terrified attempt to find safety.

2. Don’t Put Insect Repellant or Sunscreen on Your Pet that isn’t Specifically for Pet Use

What isn’t toxic to humans can be toxic to animals. The ASPCA lists the poisonous effects of sunscreen on your pet as, “…drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy.” DEET, a common insecticide, may cause neurological issues.

3. Alcoholic Drinks Poison Pets

If your pet drinks alcohol, they can become dangerously intoxicated, go into a coma, or in severe cases, die from respiratory failure. Yes, even beer is toxic; fermented hops and ethanol are poisonous to dogs and cats.

4. Going to a Fireworks Display? Leave Your Pet at Home

The safest place for your pet is at home, not in a crowded, unfamiliar and noisy place. The combination of too many people and loud fireworks will make your beloved pet freak out and desperately seek shelter. Locking them in the car is also not an option; your pet may suffer brain damage and heat stroke. Leave them in a secured, quiet area or leave music or the TV on.

5. Be Prepared if Your Pet Does Escapedef8c0a3c622b7fcd831d8135c387393--red-white-blue-cats-in-hats

If your pet manages to break loose and become lost, without proper identification it will be that much harder to get them back. Consider fitting your pet with microchip identification, ID tags with their name and your phone number, or both. It is also a good idea to have a recent picture of your pets in case you have to put up signs.

6. Keep Your Pet Away from Glow Jewelry

It might look cute, but your pet could chew up and swallow the plastic adornments. The ASPCA states that while not highly toxic, “excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.”

7. NEVER Use Fireworks Around Pets

While lit fireworks can pose a danger to curious pets and potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws, even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Some fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as arsenic, potassium nitrate, and other heavy metals.

8. Don’t Give Your Pet “Table Food”

If you are having a backyard barbeque, you may be tempted to slip some snacks to your pet. But like beer and chocolate, there are other festive foods that could harm your pet. Onions, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough are all possible hazards for dogs and cats. Keep some pet treats on hand for guests who want to offer your pet a treat.

9. Lighter Fluid and Matches Are Harmful to Pets

The ASPCA lists chlorates as a harmful chemical substance found in some matches that, if ingested, can cause your pet difficulty in breathing, damage blood cells or even cause kidney disease. If exposed to lighter fluid, your pet may sustain skin irritation on contact, respiratory problems if inhaled, and gastric problems if ingested. Hot grills are also dangerous to curious pets, keep them entertained away from the flames.

 

Oils, candles, insect coils and other citronella-based repellants are irritating toxins to pets, according to the ASPCA. The result of inhalation can cause severe respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia, and ingestion can harm your pet’s nervous system.

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/fourth-july-safety-tipshttps://www.petmd.com/dog/seasonal/evr_multi_top_ten_fourth_of_july_pet_safety_tips?page=show

 

Pet Preparedness Month: Week 3 – Dogs & Water Safety

pet-water-beach-dog-webDogs & Water Safety Water can be a great source of fun for you and your dog. Before you take your pooch out for a paddle, though, make sure you know how to keep things safe.

Swimming

You might think canines are natural-born swimmers, but that isn’t always the case. There’s no sure way to gauge your pal’s swimming skills until you introduce him to H2O and teach him the basics:

  • Choose a quiet, shallow spot in the water.
  • Keep your dog on a leash while he learns.
  • Get into the water with him.
  • Start at the edge of the water, and stay as long as he enjoys it.
  • If he doesn’t want to go, don’t force him in — especially if it’s a deep spot.
  • When your dog begins to paddle with his front legs, lift his hind legs to show him how to float.

The younger your buddy is when you teach him to swim, the better. Keep the lesson positive and stress-free for him.

At the Beach

While you enjoy the surf with your pal, keep these tips in mind:

  • Watch out for strong currents and riptides, which can take you both out to sea. Even the best swimmer can be in danger when seas are rough.
  • Don’t let your dog drink ocean water. It can make him sick. Bring fresh H2O with you to keep him hydrated.
  • Keep your pal away from fish that have washed onto the shore. They may smell great to him, but they can make him ill.

 

In the Pool

Got a swimming hole in your backyard? Keep it Fido-friendly with these steps:

  • Put a fence around it to keep your dog out when it isn’t time to swim.
  • Keep a sturdy cover over it when you aren’t using it. It should be made of a material that lets rainwater drain through. Dogs can drown in puddles on top of pool covers.
  • Teach your dog how to get in and out. Make sure there are steps or a ramp he can use to climb out.
  • Check the water temperature before letting your dog take a dip. Only a few breeds can handle extra-cold water.

 

In a River, Lake, or Pond

Keep these tips in mind when you’re at Mother Nature’s water park:

  • Get your dog a life jacket, especially if you take him out on a boat or a dock.
  • Steer clear of bodies of water with blue-green algae. It can make your buddy sick.
  • Check the current of a river or a creek. Make sure it isn’t too strong to let your dog swim.
  • Keep your pal away from fishing gear. Sharp hooks and barbs can hurt him.

 

General Safety Rules

No matter where your pooch makes a splash, follow these pointers:

  • Rinse him off after he’s been in any type of water. Seawater minerals, salt, chlorine, algae, and pollution can irritate or damage his skin and fur.
  • Remove his flea collar before he swims. Water can wash off its active ingredients.
  • Dry your dog’s ears completely to prevent an infection. Try an ear cleaner that has a drying agent in it.
  • Learn canine CPR. Mouth-to-nose resuscitation and chest compressions could save a dog’s life in an emergency.
  • Never leave your pal alone in the water.

 

https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/pets-water-safety#2-6

Pet Preparedness Month Week 2: MAKE A PLAN, BUILD A KIT

pet-disaster-plan-e1494615366325If a natural disaster strikes, what will happen to your pet?

Be prepared: make a plan and prepare a disaster kit for your pet. Leaving pets out of evacuation plans can put pets, pet owners, and first responders in danger. Even if you try to create a safe place for them, pets left behind during a disaster are likely to be injured, lost, or worse. It is your responsibility as a pet owner to find out what type of shelters and assistance are available in your area to accommodate pets and to include pets in your disaster plan to keep them safe during an emergency.

Have you included pets in your disaster plan? Don’t wait until it’s too late.

Start today by: Making a plan and preparing a disaster kit

By doing so, you are protecting the health of not only your pet, but yourself, your family, and others in your community.

To get started, familiarize yourself with the types of disasters that could impact your area and consider your options for providing care for your pet(s).

Make a Plan

Disasters can happen without warning, so be prepared for these events:

  • Make sure your pet(s) wear collars and tags with up-to-date contact information and other identification.
  • Microchip your pet(s) – this is one of the best ways to ensure that you and your pet are reunited if you are separated. Always be sure to register the microchip with the manufacturer and keep your contact information up to date with the microchip company.
  • Purchase a pet carrier for each of your pets (write your pet’s name, your name and contact information on each carrier).
    • Familiarize your pet with its transport crate before a crisis.
    • Practice transporting your pet by taking them in for rides in a vehicle similar to one you would be evacuating in.
    • Practice catching your pet, if needed.
  • Keep a leash and/or carrier nearby the exit.
  • Ensure proper equipment for pets to ride in the car (carriers, harnesses, pet seatbelts).
  • If you do not have a car, make arrangements with neighbors, family and friends.
  • Decide where you and your pet are going to stay. Based on the severity of a disaster, you may have two options for your pets:
    • Sheltering in place
    • Sheltering in a facility away from home (during an evacuation)

Sheltering in Place

When sheltering at home with your pet, make sure the room chosen is pet-friendly in the following ways:

  • Select a safe room, preferably an interior room with no (or few) windows.
  • Remove any toxic chemicals or plants.
  • Close off small areas where frightened cats could get stuck in (such as vents or beneath heavy furniture).

Sheltering during an evacuation 

  • Some jurisdictions will offer companion animal sheltering with general population and functional/access needs sheltering. Check your local media and/or County Emergency website, or ReadyErie (Erie County residents).
    • If accommodations are needed for your pet(s):
      • Contact local veterinary clinics, boarding facilities, and local animal shelters. Visit the Humane Society website to find a shelter in your area.
      • Contact family or friends outside the evacuation area.
      • Contact a pet-friendly hotel, particularly along evacuation routes.
    • Make plans before disaster strikes for where you and your pets will go. Be aware that pets may not be allowed in local human shelters, unless they are service animals.
      • Check with:
        • Family or friends outside the evacuation area.
        • Pet-friendly hotels

Prepare a Pet Disaster Kit

Prepare a disaster kit for your pet(s), so evacuation will go smoothly for your entire family. Ask your veterinarian for help putting it together. Some examples of what to include are:

  • Food (in airtight waterproof containers or cans) and water for at least 2 weeks for each pet
  • Food and water bowls and a manual can opener
  • For cats: litter box and litter
  • For dogs: plastic bags for poop
  • Clean-up items for bathroom accidents (paper towels, plastic trash bags, bleach-containing cleaning agent)
  • Medications for at least 2 weeks, along with any treats used to give the medications and pharmacy contact for refills
  • Medical records
    • Rabies vaccination certificate
    • Current vaccination record
    • If your pet has a microchip, a record of the microchip number
    • Prescription for medication(s)
    • For cats, most recent FeLV/FIV test result or vaccination date
    • Summary of pertinent medical history; ask your veterinarian for a copy
  • Sturdy leashes or harnesses
  • Carrier or cage that is large enough for your pet to stand comfortably and turn around; towels or blankets
  • Pet toys and bed (familiar items to help the pet [s] feel more comfortable).
  • A handout containing identification information (in the event you get separated from your pet)
    • Current photo of pet
    • Pet’s descriptive features (age, sex, neutered/non-neutered status, color(s), and approximate weight)
    • Microchip number
    • Owner contact information (cell phone, work phone, home phone)
    • Contact information of a close relative or friend,
  • A handout with boarding instructions, such as feeding schedule, medications, and any known allergies and behavior problems
  • Documents, medications, and food should be stored in waterproof container

https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/publications/ Photo credit: Lawrence Humane Society

June is Pet Preparedness Month – Week 1: Heat Safety

June is Pet Preparedness Month!

Each week we will feature a new safety/preparedness message, Week 1: Heat Safety

 

 

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1. Never, ever leave your dog in the car.

  • Leaving the car parked in the shade or with windows cracked is will not prevent the inside temperature from reaching dangerous levels
  • If you see a dog locked in a hot car:
    • Contact animal control or police;
    • Record the vehicle info and have the business/store make an announcement;
    • Stay with the dog until help arrives

2. Make sure your dog has unlimited access to fresh water;

3. Make sure your dog has access to shade when outside;

4. Take walks during the cooler hours of the day;

5. When walking, try to stay off of hot surfaces (like asphalt) because it can burn your dog’s paws;

  • Press the back of your hand firmly against the asphalt for at least 7 seconds to verify it will be OK for your dog.
  • When the air temperature is 77 degrees asphalt in direct sun is up to 125 degrees (at this temperature skin destruction may occur)

6. If you think it’s hot outside, it’s even hotter for your pet . Make sure your pet has a means of cooling off;

7. Keep your dog free of external parasites (fleas, ticks) and heart worms – consult your veterinarian about the best product for your pet;

8. Consider clipping or shaving dogs with long coats (talk to your veterinarian first to see if it’s appropriate for your pet), and apply sunscreen to your dog’s skin if she or he has a thin coat.

9. Know the warning signs of heatstroke

  • Heavy panting
  • Lethargy (tiredness)
  • Excessive drooling
  • Lack of coordination
  • Rapid pulse
  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea
  • Red gums and tongue

If you think your pet has heatstroke, consult your veterinarian immediately.

For more information:

 

WNY’s Furtastic Pet Adopt-a-Thon Joins One Buffalo

One Buffalo to host pet adoption event on June 16

Those seriously interested in adopting should visit participating rescues and shelters to complete application in advance of event

One Buffalo Pet Adoption
Sit n' Stay Professional Pet Sitting'

One Buffalo Pet Adoption event is coming to KeyBank Center on Saturday, June 16 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Many of Western New York’s animal shelters and rescue groups will gather under one roof to spotlight homeless pets that are currently available for adoption, and give members of the community an opportunity to meet a wide variety of pets in one location.

“We are excited to work on an event that is in keeping with the true spirit of One Buffalo and brings together our local animal shelters, rescues and WNY’s pet loving community for one simple mission, to help find forever homes for as many pets as possible,” said Tina Chaudhry, event organizer and co-creator of WNY’s Furtastic Adopt-A-Thon. “We are very grateful for the support of the Bills and Sabres in helping us accomplish our goal of saving the lives of animals.”

This adoption event will help to solve the problem of thousands of animals being killed every day as a result of overcrowded shelters. Each adoption will actually save two lives, the adopted pet and the one that takes its place at the shelter.

Participating animal shelters and rescue groups include:

This list will be updated as more participating shelters and rescue groups are added.

Prospective adopters are encouraged to complete adoption applications in advance of June 16 and must bring a photo ID to the adoption event, along with a landlord’s permission letter if they live in a rented home, and be prepared to cover the adoption fee at the event.

Complimentary parking will be available in the KeyBank Center ramp. Any rescue organizations or pet retail vendors interested in participating in the One Buffalo Pet Adoption event can contact Tina Chaudhry at pets@onebuffalo.com for more information.

About Pegula Sports and Entertainment
Pegula Sports and Entertainment (PSE) is a management company that streamlines key business areas across all Pegula family-owned sports and entertainment properties including the Buffalo Bills, Buffalo Sabres, Buffalo Bandits, Rochester Americans, HarborCenter and Black River Entertainment. PSE aims to be a leader in the sports and entertainment industry by bringing together the individual resources, capabilities and talents of each of its entities to create a cohesive and sustainable brand that together represents the Pegula family’s interest. PSE’s mission is exemplified by its One Buffalo initiative, which unites Western New York and serves as a representation of teamwork through a deeper connection between Buffalo sports teams, fans and the community.

 

Los Angeles Filmmaker to Screen Movie to Benefit Local Animal Welfare Organizations

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Buffalo, NY – Los Angeles filmmaker Jon Mancinetti will screen his award winning short film Loss and Found at the Riviera Theatre on April 11, 2018.  Jon’s film, started via a Kickstarter campaign, is currently on a national tour to share with his thousands of supporters. The event will feature:

  • PrePAWty at 5:00 PM with drink specials and raffles (Canal Club 62, 62 Webster St., North Tonawanda)
  • Movie Premiere at 7:00 PM (Riveria Theatre, 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda)
  • Meet and Greet with Mancinetti and PostPAWty featuring a red carpet, raffles , and food and drink specials (The Dockside Bar and Grill)

Fix-A-Bull WNY, a bully breed spay/neuter program and Diamonds in the Ruff Animal Rescue will be the beneficiary of funds raised at this event.  Fix-A-Bull WNY is thrilled to participate in this national touring event, organized by The Dockside Bar and Grill. Fix-A- Bull WNY has worked with local animal hospitals to spay or neuter almost 300 dogs in Erie and Niagara counties, preventing possibly thousands of puppies that could have overwhelmed local shelters and rescues.   Currently, there are over 50 dogs are on a waiting list to be spayed/neutered, and the funds raised this evening will be used for that purpose.  Diamonds in the Ruff Animal Rescue has helped thousands of dogs find their ‘furever’ homes and currently has approximately 50 dogs in foster placement. Both organizations are run entirely by volunteers.

Tickets are $15.00 per person and are still available online https://lossandfoundbuffalo.eventbrite.com or at The Dockside Bar and Grill (153 Sweeney St., North Tonawanda 14120). 100% of the ticket proceeds will be donated to Fix-A-Bull WNY and Diamonds in the Ruff Animal Rescue.  In addition, every ticket will include a 15% off coupon for food purchased at Canal Club 62 and The Dockside Bar & Grill.

“Fix-A-Bull is honored to join Jon to showcase his film, while raising awareness of fostering. We are also very excited to collaborate with Diamonds in the Ruff Animal Rescue. Collaboration among local rescue groups is critical for successful programs and awareness. When we work together, our community wins. All proceeds from this event will help fund our growing number of spay/neuter applications.  Fix-A-Bull fills that financial gap for those responsible bully breed owners that do not qualify for other spay/neuter programs. ” says Danielle Darowz-Grek of Fix-A-Bull WNY.

For more information, or to purchase tickets, go to https://lossandfoundbuffalo.eventbrite.com,

or leave a message at 716-310-7644 and a representative will return your call.

For More Information:

Loss and Found Movie Trailer http://mancinettipictures.com/
Fix-A-Bull WNY www.fixabullwny.org;   info@fixabullwny.org

Diamonds in the Ruff Animal Rescue http://diamondsintheruffanimalrescue.rescuegroups.org

diamondunderdogs@yahoo.com

The Dockside Bar & Grill

Canal Club 62

Riviera Theatre and Performing Arts Center